What are DNS records?

DNS data or records are associated with each domain name. These ensure that the traffic to your domain name is properly directed, both with regard to the website and e-mail. 

DNS settings are linked to name servers. When making changes to your DNS settings, ensure that the correct name servers are active.
Via the control panel of Register.eu you can only make changes to the Register.eu name servers.

Changes to your DNS settings will only take effect after 1 to 4 hours

The distribution time is usually 1 hour, but can go up to 4. When changing the name servers it can even go up to 24 hours.

Web forwarding


If you want to redirect a domain, you can create a web forward. A web forward is actually an A-record that refers to a server that does nothing more than redirect the visitor of the domain to the destination of the web forward.
More info about web forwarding

A-records


This type of record provides the reference of hostnames to IP addresses. For example, it is used to make your domain name refer to your hosting account on the Register.eu web servers.
Eg www.ninefortwo.be refers via an A-record to the IP address 185.18.9.249
More info about A-records

AAAA-records


This type of record provides the reference of hostnames to IPv6 addresses. For example, it is used to make your domain name refer to your hosting account on the Register.eu web servers.
Eg www.ninefortwo.be refers via a AAAA-record to the IP address 2002: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: d915: be51
More info about AAAA-records

CNAME-records


With this type of record you can have hostnames refer to other hostnames. The operation is approximately the same as that of an A record, except that no reference is made to an IP-address but to another hostname.
Eg autodiscover.ninefortwo.be refers via a CNAME-record to a utodiscover.mailprotect.be
More info about CNAME-records

MX-records


An MX-record, or Mail Exchange record, ensures the correct routing of your e-mail traffic. It determines which servers are responsible for processing your e-mails and in which order.
More info about MX-records

TXT-records


These records link the domain name to a piece of text. These records are often used to set SPF and DKIM records (these help fight spam) or for validation records (so that you can prove to a third party that you are indeed the owner of the domain name).
More info about TXT-records

SPF-records


An SPF-record is a TXT-record that specifies which smtp servers may send mail from your domain name. For example, spam filters know which e-mails sent with your domain name are legitimate and which are not.
More info about SPF-records

SRV-records

An SRV record is a type of DNS Record that determines the location of servers for specific services. It is required when you use services such as SIP, XMPP, CalDAV, LDAP and others. It is sometimes required for the automatic configuration of an e-mail address in the e-mail client.
More info about SRV records

CAA-records

With a CAA record you have more control over the SSL certificates that are issued for your domain name. You indicate which certification authorities (CA) can issue an SSL certificate on your domain name.
More info about CAA-records

Updated on 20 August 2020

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